2014 Dalbello Krypton KR2 Fusion with ID Liner Mens Ski Boots Overview


Shop Men's Dalbello Ski Boots




Video Transcription


Hi, welcome to Ski Talk. I'm Steve your host. I'm the ski buyer and Ski-E-O at skis.com. Joining us today is Ray Skelton our Dalbello Rep. Thanks for joining us, Ray. Thanks, Steve. And in my hand is the Dalbello KR2 Fusion with an ID Liner.


This is part of the Krypton series which has gotten a lot of rave reviews over the years. This is just a full-on, great ripper boot for that guy who is a good skier but it's a 98 last so this is a tight-fitting boot. This is for a guy who is maybe an ex-racer or the guy who's got a narrow foot or wants that really super tight fit, right? Right. Absolutely. But I want to talk about C4. So, you guys have done some things that allows that tight fit to not necessarily have those pressure points or pain that sometimes people have associated with such a low last boot. Yeah, C4 is really unique. We started doing it in our race boots a couple years ago but what it is, in a nutshell, is C4 stands for Comfort 4 Fit. There's typically 4 key spots that you have to... I know one of them is right there where your sixth toe is, right? So, what we did is these four spots, one is the sixth toe area so on the outside of your foot where your foot might feel wider. We also punched or shaped by the navicular bone; that bone below your ankle, we shaped the ankle bone, the inside ankle bone, which is one of my key spots that's always trouble and then the other one is right above the heel where a lot of people will get rubbing in a boot and create a problem there so the boot is shaped and fits a foot out of the box really well.


It's also got some other interesting things going on. You've got buckles that go in 2 directions, you've got only 3 buckles instead of 4. You've got a three-piece boot. How does that all work together? Well, there's a lot of things that happen here but one I'll hit on is three-piece because this is the three- piece boot in the industry and what the three-piece boot is is you have a lower shell and the lower shell comes up about this high inside. Then you have the rear cuff. The rear cuff though, the key thing is the super low hinge point. It allows the cuff to flex absolutely pure and anatomical the way that your leg meets your foot. And then the third thing which ties it all together is an independent tongue which is ribbed and it's also made out of nylon. It's a nylon Polymint. And a lot of people will say, well Ray, what's that all about? Well what it is, this black material here is polyurethane. That's good, tough ski boot material like you make racing boots out of. It's solid, it's strong but what it does, when you see it rebound, it rebounds slower. And what the nylon tongue does is different than any other boot material, is nylon is super highly resilient. When you flex forward in this boot, the nylon tongue snaps back with incredible speed so when you drive into a...let's say you drive into a mogul or you're jumping off a cliff or wherever else that you need that rebound, that's what the nylon tongue gives you.


Now, this has got an ID, that particular model doesn't, but we're selling it with the ID Liner. Right. Which is a full, heat-moldable custom fit liner. Right. 100% moldable, every single centimeter of your foot. All right and any other features we missed on this boot. Well, tell us, talk to us about why the buckles go in 2 different directions. Yeah, what Steve is talking about, there's two unique things with the buckles. With a three-piece shell, with the slow hinge point, first of all, you have the cable buckle here. And that cable wraps around one of the ribs and it draws you back into the heel. It gives you the best heel hold down in the industry. And then the other one that Steve thinks is pretty unique, and we joke about this, is the front buckle. He said they put it on backwards. Well, what we did was, years ago when we first started building freestyle boots, these kids are out hitting rails and boxes and things that might flip a buckle open or break a buckle off and so we reversed the buckle and it prevents most of that from happening. But it's not necessarily a freeride boot, it's really for that all-mountain skier, right? Right, yeah, Steve says yeah it's not freestyle, I'm not skiing park with this but, hey, you might be brushing up against a tree, a rock, you're out hiking boot pack which will flip your buckles open so it's, it just turns out it's a very logical and great buckle.


All right, so a 120 flex to start out with. Right. That's definitely on the very stiff side. Who's this boot, and you can actually adjust the flex on it as well, right? Absolutely. The flex is adjustable from 120 all the way up to virtually 140-150. You can basically block it. In the back of the boot, the lower shell splits. They call it spines. And, out of the box, there's no block in that spine. If you put the boot into the next position when the spines are split, you put a block into it... Which is in the box so it comes with the boot. Comes with the parts and it makes the boot stiffer by about 20% or so. Then you can go to an upper position which blocks the flex entirely. Basically turns it into cement. Yeah, almost like a racing boot. This boot can literally be sold to any high end skier of almost any weight so you can take and have an all-mountain ripper and you can have an all-mountain ripper that is the biggest, strongest guy in the hill. But this boot is not for the faint-of-heart. This is for a good, serious high-performance skier. Yeah, this is any upper end skier that's going to ski the best places in the world. That's the few. Great. Well, thanks Ray, that was a great explanation on that boot and thanks for joining us today on Ski Talk. Thank you.


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